A child under the age of five is twice as

likely to die in a residential fire than the

rest of the population.

 

  • ·        Matches, lighters, and other heat sources are the leading causes of

                   fire deaths for children. Never underestimate your child's curiosity

                   about fire, nor their ability to strike matches or start a lighter.

 

  • ·        Store matches and lighters out of children's reach and sight,

                   preferably in a locked cabinet. Remember: even child-resistant

                   lighters are not childproof and should be stored securely as well.

 

  • ·        When a child is curious about fire or has been playing with fire,

                   calmly and firmly explain that matches and lighters are tools for

                   only adults to use carefully.

 

  • ·        In addition, instruct toddlers to tell you when they find a match or

                   lighter.

 

  • ·        Never use matches or lighters as amusement for your children.

                   They may imitate your actions.

 

This information and Image were provided by the U.S. Fire Administration Website, for more information please visit http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/campaigns/usfaparents/

 

 

Home Fire Safety Starts with YOU!!

 

Why should my home have smoke alarms?

  •        Most fire deaths are caused by smoke- not flames
  •        Most fire deaths and injuries occur between midnight and 8 a.m. when families are asleep
  •        Seconds count! You only have minutes to escape a house fire
  •        The earlier a smoke alarm alerts you to a fire, the more likely you will get out alive

 

Where do I install smoke alarms?

  •        On each level of your home
  •        Outside each sleeping area
  •        Inside each bedroom

 

How do I keep my smoke alarm working?

  • Test smoke alarms monthly
  • Vacuum smoke alarms regularly to remove dust and cobwebs
  • Never disconnect or remove smoke alarm batteries for other uses

For More information on smoke alarms and Oregon's smoke alarm law, visit www.oregon.gov/osp/sfm/commed_sa_program.shtml